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Robert D. Brownstone is the Technology & eDiscovery Counsel and Chair of the Electronic Information Management Group (EIM) Practice Group at Fenwick & West LLP, a national firm with a special mission and headquartered in Silicon Valley. Bob advises clients on electronic discovery, EIM, retention/ destruction, information-security, privacy and social-media.

A dynamic nationwide speaker and prolific writer on many law-and-technology issues, Bob is frequently quoted in the press as an expert on electronic information. He teaches Electronic Discovery Law & Process annually at the University of San Francisco (USF) and University of Puerto Rico (UPR) Schools of Law and has also taught it at Santa Clara U. (SCU) School of Law.

Now in his 27th year as a lawyer, Bob is a member of four state bars and serves on the Advisory Board of the National Employment Law Institute (NELI). To learn more, see Bob’s full bio and extensive bibliography.

Technology Assisted Review (TAR) / Predictive Coding — New Decision

Thanks to Hon. (Ret.)  Andrew J. Peck, now Senior Counsel at DLA Piper, I just learned of a hot-off-the-presses (yesterday) Technology Assisted Review decision by the Utah federal district court.

For a quote from, and link to, the Entrata decision, check out the recent

EU GDPR eDiscovery — Top Ten Tips for Litigators

by Robert Brownstone and Tyler Newby 
(with thanks to Shannon Turner and Sandra Pomeroy)

NOT LEGAL ADVICE.  This non-exhaustive Letterman-style list is to help you spot the GDPR’s potential impacts on data collection and production in litigation involving EU persons


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Hi all.    Exterro has recently published what looks like a fine overview of the eDiscovery process, “The Basics of E-Discovery Guide.”  It describes a wide range of topics in easily digestible chunks.

Sprinkled throughout are quotes from various folks in the eDiscovery field.  Yours truly is one of those people.  My snippet is

Introduction Now that you’ve likely had your fill of turkey sandwiches, turkey salad, turkey soup and the like, there is a new development on which to focus.  On midnight December 1, 2015 the eDiscovery-related Federal Rules of Civil Procedure changed for the first time since their adoption exactly nine years ago. The changes fall into three categories:

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